M200 - Building Success - Chicken coop Plans - Chicken Coop Design - How to build a chicken coop

M200 - Building Success - Chicken coop Plans - Chicken Coop Design - How to build a chicken coop
It can comfortably hold 20 - 25 chickens
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Thanks for sharing great building of Our friends:
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Hi,
Here are 2 photos of the coop I built from your design.I had to add a few more roof timbers because of the extreme snow load here in Maine,but other than that I followed your plan.The interior is fully insulated and covered with tongue and groove knotty pine boards--people tell me it is the nicest chicken coop they have ever seen. Thank You !

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Hi Frank,
Construction cost was around $2,500 and it took 2 months working alone and fighting the unpredictable spring weather here in Maine.
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Hi Frank,
Here's the front view of my coop with it's happy occupants.Instead of using 1" boards for roof sheathing, I used 1/2"exterior plywood,but I used a 4"x4" ridge timber supported by upright 4"x4" supports on both ends and in the middle because of our winter snow load.For the lid over the nesting boxes,I used 3/4" plywood because two layers of boards would have been too heavy for my wife to lift.For the windows,I bought sliding vinyl ones at a local building supply store.It is insulated with 3 1/2" fiberglass in the ceiling and walls and finished off with 1X6 knotty pine tongue and groove boards---very cozy.More pictures to follow.
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The building now has stairs leading to the door

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The roof is covered with 40 year architectural shingles
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Hi Frank,
I forgot to ask if you noticed the automatic feeder I built from your plans at the bottom right of the picture?

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One of our hens laying an egg in one of the nesting boxes---we use eastern white pine shavings for bedding

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The finished interior of my coop---tongue and groove knotty pine

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Hi Frank,
This is the extra 4x4 crossmember and jack post that I added in the middle of the span for extra load protection in the winter.

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Here's the roof rafter detail showing the hurricane ties I used to connect the rafters---much stronger than toe-nailing

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You'll notice that the eave vents are off center.This is due to the placement of the end jackposts that support the ridge beam.I covered the openings for winter.Normally there is heavy duty galvanized steel screening in the openings which allow air flow and keep out varmints like weasels that can decimate a flock in one night.I also sealed the underside of thr eaves for the same reason.

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Hi Frank,
Thank you for posting my photos on your website. I'm very flattered. My family was here from Texas for the holiday, and my son in law called the chicked coop "A five star hotel for chickens". The chickens agree.
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Hi Frank,
Here's a photo of the coop early on in it's construction. You can see how I supported the ridge timber from underneath with 4x4s. There's one support under each end of the building, one in the center of the run, and one on it's far end. This picture was taken in April and the leaves hadn't budded yet from the previous winter---soon it will all be covered with snow. Best Regards,

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M200 - Building Success - Chicken coop Plans - Chicken Coop Design - How to build a chicken coop
It can comfortably hold 20 - 25 chickens
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Units: Inches - fractions
Overall size: 4' 11" x 6' 5 1/2" for Cage
6' 5 1/2" x 1' 8" for Nesting Boxes for 4 Hens
20' 1/2" x 9' 10 1/2" x 9' 4 7/8" (height) for area of ​​the building
Construction area: 197.5 Feet ²
Total volume of wood: 215158 1/2 inch3
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Units: Millimeters - decimal
Overall size: 1.88m x 1.50m for Cage
1.88m x 1.50m for Nesting Boxes for 4 Hens
6.11m x 3.01m x 2.87m (height) for area of ​​the building
Construction area: 18.5 Meters ²
Total volume of wood: 3.4m3
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Thank you very much!

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